blog tour

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Don’t Kill the Dog: Sabine Durrant on (Breaking) the Rules of Writing

Lie With Me, by Sabine Durrant, was one of my favourite reads of 2016. It was so good that I lent it to my sister (NatalieReads), who lent it to my mum, who lent it to her friend… and I’m not quite sure where exactly it is right now – I think I’m going to have to buy a handful of copies just to get mine back! When a book is so good, it’s always fascinating to me to find out a bit more about the author; why they write, what inspires them, and their general thoughts about things. So, as part of the Lie With Me blog tour, here’s a short piece from Sabine Durrant talking about the ‘rules’ of writing – and why sometimes you have to break them! One of the unspoken rules of screen-writing is: don’t kill the dog. You can slash throats, blow men to…

A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart

I am estranged. – Opening sentence A Boy Made of Blocks isn’t the usual sort of book I’m attracted to. I’m naturally drawn to darker works of fiction; stories of politics, war, discrimination etc. (that makes me sound a bit like an emo, but I’m sure there are those of you who understand). However, after reading the synopsis of A Boy Made of Blocks – a story about a young boy with autism, and his Dad who’s a little bit lost – I was reminded of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime. I loved that book, and so I took up the opportunity to read A Boy Made of Blocks for this blog tour, and I wasn’t disappointed! This is a truly heartwarming read, and one that I imagine I will read again and again whenever I am feeling down or uninspired. It starts with Alex. A thirty-something Dad to…

Q+A with Rebecca Mackenzie, author of ‘In a Land of Paper Gods’

In a Land of Paper Gods is the debut novel from Rebecca Mackenzie, a writer, poet and performer. Set in China in 1941, in follows the story of a young girl called Etta, and her dorm mates, during the Second World War: Jiangxi Province, China, 1941. Atop the fabled mountain of Lushan perches a boarding school for the children of British missionaries. While her parents pursue their calling, ten-year-old Henrietta S. Robertson discovers that she has been singled out by the Lord. As Japanese invaders draw closer, Etta and her dorm mates retreat into a world where boundaries between make believe and reality become dangerously blurred. So begins a remarkable journey, through a mystical landscape and to the heart of a war. I’m still half-way through reading it, and I am currently enjoying the subtle touch of magic; Mackenzie’s writing reminds me of some of my favourite books growing up. Etta,…

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