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Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

There was no possibility of taking a walk that day. – Opening sentence I had the pleasure of attending a book-themed wedding a few weeks ago. It was a wholehearted lovely. Each table at the reception was themed around a different book, and the parting gift to all guests was a book (or four, in my case!). This is how I came about my first copy of Jane Eyre, a classic that I had never gotten around to reading. I knew that it was celebrated amongst book lovers, but in my youth I’d always dreaded the ‘old fashioned’ and instead stuck to modern fiction. However, the day after the wedding I found myself sitting in one of the comfy seats in Costa, and decided to try the first few chapters of Jane Eyre – and I was immediately hooked. I can’t even fully explain it, but there a charm in…

The Child by Fiona Barton

My computer is winking at me knowingly as I sit down at my desk. – Opening sentence The Child is Fiona Barton’s second crime/thriller novel, following her successful first title, The Widow (which I haven’t read). In classic crime style, The Child starts begins with an horrific discovery; the body of a newborn baby, discovered in a building site in London. Kate Waters, an old-school journalist trying to survive in a world full of online click-bait-churning zombies, decides to do some digging. But the story is much bigger (and darker) than she initially expected, and Kate is drawn into an emotional and dangerous story – putting a strain on both her personal and professional relationships. Barton herself used to be a senior writer at the Daily Mail and news editor at the Daily Telegraph, which helped to bring the character of Kate Waters to life, and make the interactions more believable and realistic. I,…

Gather the Daughters by Jennie Melamed

Vanessa dreams she is a grown woman, heavy with flesh and care. – Opening sentence Gather the Daughters is a dark and uncomfortable novel that I know is going to haunt me for a while. It follows the story of a small community of island-dwellers, told from the perspective of four young girls. The ‘wastelands’ surrounding their island are full of disease, war and defectives – life on the island is the only life. Newborn boys are celebrated with laughter, girls with tears. These girls know that as soon as they experience their first bleed – coming of age – they will be married and have children. That is what happens to all the woman on the island during the ‘summer of fruition’, where all the eligible men and new young woman spend the summer together until they are all paired off and married by Autumn. This is how it has always been on the…

Waking Gods by Sylvain Neuvel

A twenty-story-tall metallic figure appeared in the middle of Regent’s Park this morning. – Opening sentence Waking Gods is the second book in The Themis Files; the sequel to Sleeping Giants (one of my top reads of 2016). As a fan of science-fiction, I LOVED Sleeping Giants – but I think I loved Waking Gods even more! The second book is much darker, in a way that I wasn’t quite expecting, but it worked really well and was the right direction for book #2. Waking Gods is written in the same style as Sleeping Giants, through a series of interviews, news reports and journal entries. It’s an unorthodox style that Neuvel pulls off really well, and it in no way hinders the reader experience. While Sleeping Giants set the scene and gave us a lot of background information, Waking Gods needed no introduction and jumped straight into the action. This made Waking…

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

Dear friend, I am writing to you because she said you listen and understand and didn’t try to sleep with that person at the party even though you could have. – Opening sentence The Perks of Being a Wallflower has been on my wishlist for a very long time. I knew it was a book of note, along the same lines of The Catcher of the Rye, but for some reason I’d never quite gotten around to reading it. But then, my younger sister (and fellow book blogger) gave me a copy for Christmas and I finally got my opportunity to read it. For some reason, I had always assumed that it was written from a girl’s perspective. I don’t know why I assumed this, I think when the film came out there was a lot of focus on Emma Watson and her role, which made me think she was the…

A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart

I am estranged. – Opening sentence A Boy Made of Blocks isn’t the usual sort of book I’m attracted to. I’m naturally drawn to darker works of fiction; stories of politics, war, discrimination etc. (that makes me sound a bit like an emo, but I’m sure there are those of you who understand). However, after reading the synopsis of A Boy Made of Blocks – a story about a young boy with autism, and his Dad who’s a little bit lost – I was reminded of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime. I loved that book, and so I took up the opportunity to read A Boy Made of Blocks for this blog tour, and I wasn’t disappointed! This is a truly heartwarming read, and one that I imagine I will read again and again whenever I am feeling down or uninspired. It starts with Alex. A thirty-something Dad to…

Human Acts by Han Kang

‘Looks like rain,’ you mutter to yourself. – Opening sentence Before Human Acts, I had never heard of the Gwangju Uprising of 1980. Now, I’m sat here wondering how a massacre can go forgotten, and how many others have I never heard of. Just because I live on the other side of the world, does that mean it is right for something so horrific to be unreported? Or is it irrelevant? I might not have known about the Gwangju Uprising, but I grew up learning about Stalin’s and Hitler’s mass murders. I watched the Twin Towers fall on my parents television set, too young to fully understand but aware that hundreds of people had died. As you can probably tell, Human Acts isn’t the most upbeat of books. Han Kang tells the story of the Gwangju Uprising through multiple characters over a period of thirty years. Human Acts may be a work…

Lie With Me by Sabine Durrant

Thanks to BookBridgr for my copy of Lie With Me, it sat on my shelf for a while before I got around to reading it, and I now regret not picking it up a lot sooner, because WOW. What. A. TWIST! I am blown away by the cruelty of it; the cleverness of it; Sabine Durrant is an excellent storyteller. It starts with Paul Morris, an immediately unlikeable character who I hated from the very beginning. He’s exactly the type of man I can’t stand; pretentious, selfish and a serial womanizer – you know the sort. A struggling writer, Paul had an instant hit years back during collage, but has failed to produce anything on the same level of success since. In fact, Paul is so egotistical that he consistently tells his friends that he’s loving life as a lone bachelor with a best-seller in the works,  when in actual fact his last…

The Wolf Road by Beth Lewis

I sat up high, oak branch ‘tween my knees, and watched the tattooed man stride about in the snow. – Opening sentence I received an absolutely beautiful proof copy of The Wolf Road from HarperFiction back in April, and spent the last two months staring at it wistfully before I finally caught up with my TBR pile and got the chance to read it. I’d been seeing great reviews in my Twitter feed, so my expectations were pretty high. And wow. I mean seriously, WOW. Set in a future ravaged by a forgotten war, The Wolf Road follows the journey of Elka, a wild girl in a wild world who is on a mission to find her parents (and escape her dark past). The way is long, and fraught with difficulties and challenges. But Elka is not like other girls her age, she was raised in the forest and knows how to survive. But survival isn’t the problem.…

Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel

It was my eleventh birthday. – Opening sentence I have always been a fan of science-fiction, so when I heard about Sleeping Giants I instantly knew it would be something I’d like. I mean, a story about giant robots? It reminded of The Iron Giant, one of my favourite childhood stories, and after I saw the BEAUTIFUL cover art I was sold (literally – I bought a special-edition signed copy from Goldsboro Books the next day). And what can I say? The beginning of the story is science-fiction at its best; a young girl falling into the giant, metal hand of a dismembered robotic hand. How effing cool is that? Years later, that same young girl becomes the lead scientist of a project to uncover the mysteries behind this bizarre find, uncovering more alien artifacts until they piece together an ancient, all-powerful alien robot. But where did it come from? Why was it abandoned,…

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